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Archive for June, 2011

FROM HEALTH.COM

You probably read headlines this year that screamed: “Why Exercise Won’t Make You Thin!” Those stories were based on a controversial Public Library of Science study that showed women who exercised regularly for six months were no more likely to lose weight than women who didn’t work out at all.

How could that be? We all know that exercise burns calories; an hour on the treadmill torches 300 to 500.

Here’s the deal: Much of what was written about the study was misleading, says its lead author, Timothy Church, MD, director of preventive research at Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The study didn’t focus on calories; all participants followed their regular diets.

What the study showed, Dr. Church says, is that exercise alone, especially if you eat poorly, may not help you lose weight. “Exercise doesn’t give you carte blanche to eat whatever you want,” he says. “People think an hour on a treadmill burns off a whole chocolate cake. In reality, it’s half a slice.”

It’s true that exercising without dieting—or worse, piling on calorie-rich food just because you worked up a sweat—won’t lead to weight-loss success, agrees Susan Roberts, PhD, professor of nutrition at Tufts Univer-sity. But dieting without exercise isn’t the answer, either.

In fact, The National Weight Control Registry, a group that follows how 6,000 people have lost weight and kept it off, found that the most successful participants work out at least 30 minutes every day. The truth: Combining smart dieting and regular exercise offers the best chance to reach your weight-loss goals.

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FROM VEGNEWS.COM

Give your cooking the gourmet treatment with this exquisite salad. Spicy, flavorful quinoa and roasted sweet potatoes complement cool slices of avocado, and pan-friend tortilla strips add the perfect crunch.

Serves 4

What You Need:

  • 1 cup quinoa, cooked in vegetable stock and cooled to room temperature
  • 1/2 jalapeño, minced
  • 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, minced and divided
  • 1 sweet potato, peeled and cut into 1/4-inch dice
  • 4 tablespoons plus 3 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Canola Oil
  • 2 corn tortillas, cut into 1/4-inch strips
  • 1 teaspoon Cajun seasoning
  • Juice of one lime
  • 2 tomatillos in olive oil, skins removed
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon light agave nectar
  • 2 avocados, diced
  • Microgreens

What You Do:

  1. In a medium bowl place quinoa, jalapeño, 1 tablespoon cilantro, 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, lime juice, and salt and pepper to taste, and toss to combine.
  2. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In a small bowl, toss the sweet potatoes with 2 teaspoons olive oil, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Spread a single layer on a baking sheet and roast for 15 minutes, or until soft in the middle and lightly browned; be careful not to let the sweet potatoes burn.
  3. Lower the oven temperature to 350 degrees. In a small bowl, toss the tomatillos with 1 teaspoon of olive oil. Place on a baking sheet and roast for 15 minutes. Transfer to a food processor, add the vinegar, 1/4 cup cilantro, and agave nectar, and pulse to combine. With the motor running, pour in the remaining 3 tablespoons olive oil in a thin stream. Continue blending until emulsified. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Pour 2 inches of canola oil into a small, heavy pot and heat until the oil shimmers. Add the tortilla strips and fry until crisp and browned, 1 to 2 minutes. Drain on paper towels and sprinkle with Cajun seasoning.
  5. Place a 3-inch ring mold in the center of one of 4 salad plates. Fill with 1/4 of the quinoa mixture and press down with a spoon to pack the mold, smoothing the top. Place 1/4 of the sweet potato pieces on top of the quinoa and press down gently. Top with 1/4 of the avocado and press down gently. Carefully remove the mold. Repeat on the remaining salad plates.
  6. Carefully place 2 tortilla strips parallel to each other about 1 inch apart on top of each timbale. Place 2 more tortilla strips perpendicular on top of those. Top the timbales with the microgreens and drizzle the dressing around the timbales.

Good luck, healthy girl!

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Milk and other dairy products might seem like a good idea.  They’re pretty delicious and go great with other foods.  They are high in calcium, which is good for the bones, but they are also high in lactose, casein and other nutrients that sometimes are rejected by the body. These substances can worsen allergies, including both food and seasonal allergies.

Food Allergies

If you have an over reactive immune system, then you may have allergies. The symptoms will appear after you have eaten something that the immune system thinks is attacking the body. The immune system then goes into a defense mode to stop the attacker, thus causing the symptoms. Symptoms may vary from person to person and may include headaches, abdominal pain, arthritis, hives, nasal congestion, asthma and many more.

The most common foods that cause allergic reactions are dairy products, wheat, corn, soy and peanuts. If you experience any allergy symptoms you should eliminate these foods from your diet for a few weeks and then gradually bring them back into your diet one at a time. This will help you determine which foods you are allergic to. Once you find the culprit, you can eliminate that food from your diet.

Seasonal Allergies and Dairy Products

Seasonal allergies are also the result of the immune system overreacting. But this time the invader is airborne and is usually in the form of pollen, dust or other foreign particles that the system does not recognize. Symptoms usually include sneezing, an itchy and runny nose and difficulty breathing.

One of the biggest reasons that dairy products worsen seasonal allergy symptoms is because dairy contains arachidonic acids, which increase the production of leukotrienes. Leukotrienes restrict the bronchial tubes, thus making it difficult for air to get through. This can bring on the production of phlegm and mucus, which can worsen the symptoms of allergies.

Dairy Products and the Immune System

Dairy and dairy products also play a key role in the weakening of the immune system. When the immune system is weak, it causes an overreaction to certain foods, pollen or dust, and can also make other allergy symptoms worse.

One of the proteins found in dairy that weakens the immune system is casein. Casein in limited quantities is good for you. However, the high amounts of casein found in dairy products is too much for the human body to properly digest. This causes excess proteins to float around the body, which in turn can worsen allergies.

Furthermore, many dairy products contain high amounts of saturated fats, which also contribute to weakening the immune system. These products include milk, butter, cheese and ice cream.

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